Lesley EARTS 6008

August 14th, 2008 | by scottleduc |

Course Overview

What do I need to do for this class?

1. Read the pre-reading article before the first weekend and take the pre-class survey

Due 1st Saturday morning

2. Participate with class activities Rubric, culminating in the creation of a multimedia portfolio key assignment Created in class Key Rubric

3. Create and deliver a digital imagery infused lesson
presentation
Due 2nd weekend Rubric

4. Maintain a learning journal

Due within 30 days of last class Rubric

5. Read and annotate required articles

Due within 30 days of last class Rubric

6. Create and deliver a technology infused integrated art lesson Due within 30 days of last class rubric

SYLLABUS CONTENTS

INSTRUCTOR

What Is Great Teaching?

by Tom Snyder

If you ask 40 students from a liberal, east-coast graduate school of education to write one page about their most influential teacher, will the results be predictable? I did it, and they weren’t.

I drew a ten-foot line on the blackboard that was to represent a continuum of teaching styles described by these one-page papers. After reading a paper aloud, we would attach that paper somewhere along the line, the left end reserved for the most open-ended teaching styles: student-centered, discovery-learning based, teacher as copilot in the voyage of learning.

The right end of the line would be reserved for the most teacher-driven, autocratic, personality-and charisma-based teaching. After reading each page aloud, I then walked the line, asking the class to vote for the most appropriate place to tape the writing to the board. So where were all the papers clustered when we had finished? Please guess before reading on. . .

This particular group of forty papers was distributed as smooth as silk over ten feet of imaginable styles.

On the left were teachers from the 1970s who let their students create their own collages/films/newspapers/solar collectors/geodesic this and that’s. The right end of the line held accounts of passionate teachers who said, ‘give yourself fully to me for a semester or two and in return I will show you how to perceive a still-life, how to understand the flux of history, how Shakespeare can be felt deep in the heart. Across the middle of the line were spread all of the other heroes of teaching.

You could say that this particular continuum shows us that there is no one particular winning style. Or you could reasonably claim that this continuum produces no new understanding. More interesting would be a spectrum that crowded the cherished memories of students on one end. What would that spectrum be, we asked ourselves. Try a continuum that sails from passionate to indifferent, or from willing to connect with students to personally inaccessible.

There, we thought, you will get agreement.

Reading the literature from the world of school technologies over the last decade, one gets the impression that the true heroic work of microprocessors will be to relieve us from the tyranny of teacher-centered learning. If this happens, we will be disappointing at least half of our students. The achievements of educational progressivism have been many. I, for one, owe my career to them. The failed aspects of progressivism have emasculated, diminished, and subverted the intuitive efforts of many teachers.

In England, recent studies of progressive classrooms have revealed teachers who spend far too much time apologizing for their intrusions. Don’t tell the kids the answers. OK. Don’t even tell the kids the questions. OK. As a matter of fact, could you move out of the frame, please? Sure, if that’s what is best. . .

Passion, relationships, fascination, humanity, caring: some teachers will demonstrate the power of these from afar and some from on high. In the coming century we shall discover, and I only hope it does not take too long, that technology’s job is to support their choice.

retention

As a student I learned mainly for myself. When I did share information, it was usually with the teacher, who already knew it. As a teacher, on the other hand, I was responsible for conveying concepts, content, and skills that were new to my audience. I had to think about how others would understand the material. The act of creating that explanation, of putting the content into my own words, increased my own understanding.
- David Dockterman, Tom Snyder Productions

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Instructional strategies that employ teaching others result in the best learning retention rate.

COURSE BLACKBOARD
SITE

COURSE WIKI and MAP

DATES

  • July 9-10, August 6-7, 2011

TIMES

  • Saturday and Sunday 8AM-5PM
When the student is ready the teacher will appear. - Buddhist Proverb

LOCATION

  • Skyview Elementary, 16924 East Wellesley Avenue Spokane, WA

SITE and LAB COORDINATORS

  • Nicole Bess, nbess@lesley.edu
  • Jeremy Hedrick, myless860@gmail.com

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COURSE
DESCRIPTION

This course will engage students in arts-based technology using a variety of software programs. Students will gain an understanding of technology and its many applications across disciplines and in the world around them. Working collaboratively and/or independently, students will learn to use technology in a caring, stimulating, safe, and creative learning environment.

Through hands-on techniques that can apply to a variety of educational settings students will explore how technology can be applied to an integrated arts curriculum that supports creative expression. In addition students are introduced to the pedagogic and curriculum issues related to the creative arts and technology in the digital classroom.

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We are digital immigrants (Alan November) while our students are native speakers. It will take twice as much work on our parts to develop fluency. Be patient with yourself!

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • To gain an understanding of and initial practice with multimedia technology
  • To gain an understanding of and the rationale for using, managing, and implementing multimedia technology into the arts curriculum.
  • To develop a critical perspective on the role technology plays in education and the arts
  • To gain an understanding of the multiple intelligences, the constructivist classroom, and alternative assessment practices, as they relate to the arts curriculum.
  • To learn the multimedia technology skills necessary for applying technology in an educational setting.
  • To develop on-line research strategies using websites and on-line databases
  • To explore ways of using educational technology with creative arts in the curriculum.
  • To help students identify their educational technology needs.

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COURSE BENCHMARKS

  • Students will . . .
    • initiate a digital record of student work and
      performance in the Creative Arts (Key Assignment),

      • to include demonstrations of customized audio file
        creation,
      • digital picture manipulation,
      • video clip use, and
      • presentation software;
    • create a thematic unit plan
      • for the integration and management of multimedia
        technology
      • for the student’s own classroom application
        reflecting constructivist practices & theories;
    • individually, collaboratively, and cooperatively
      problem solve in the construction and implementation of multimedia
      projects;
    • analyze their multimedia instructional plan in the
      light of learning theory and research into instructional design;
    • evaluate alternative assessment strategies and tools
      and create a customized assessment for multimedia projects.

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The research on teacher quality to-date shows that teacher knowledge and mastery of subject matter, and cognitive and verbal ability can positively impact student achievement - (Paige, R, 2003). Paige, R (2003) Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Challenge: The Secretary’s Annual Report on Teacher Quality. US Department of Education. Office of Planning and Innovation.

COURSE
REQUIREMENTS

  • Academic Integrity Policy
    • Academic honesty and integrity are essential to the existence and growth of an academic community. Each member of the Lesley community is charged with honoring and upholding the University’s policy. Students are full members of the academic community and, as such, are obligated to uphold the University’s standards for academic integrity. Students should take an active role in encouraging others to respect these standards, and should become familiar with Lesley’s policy.  The policy details students’ roles and responsibilities, and provides examples of violations (including information about failing to document sources, plagiarism, cheating, fabrication or falsification of data, multiple submissions of work, abuse of academic materials, complicity/unauthorized assistance, lying/tampering/theft, etc.). The complete policy can be found on the Lesley University Web page.
  • Portfolio Development
    • School of Education Master’s degree and licensure candidates* are required to develop a program portfolio, comprised of the key assignment from each course in their programs. Through these identified key assignments, students will demonstrate acquisition of both knowledge and skills and will demonstrate professional growth over time. The portfolios will be used for institutional and teacher self-evaluation as well as for review by accrediting agencies. They will also provide evidence that students are meeting required state and professional standards, and will confirm that Lesley’s programs are meeting their stated outcomes.
      • Students will build their portfolios in one of two ways, depending on their program start dates.
      • *Students enrolled in the Science Online Master’s or the Out Of School Time Master’s Programs are exempt from the portfolio requirement at this time
    • If you began your off-campus or online program after October 25, 2010, or your on-campus program after January 1, 2010
      • You will be required to use MAP (My Assessment Portfolio) and must register for a mandatory, online MAP orientation course that features a tutorial for how to set up a MAP portfolio. Issues related to registration for the orientation course and technical issues related to the use of MAP can be directed to map@lesley.edu
      • You must upload the key assignment for each of your courses into your MAP program portfolio as part of the course requirements. Your faculty member will use the rubric that is posted in MAP to assess how effectively you completed the key assignment.
    • If you began your off-campus or online program before October 25, 2010 or your on-campus program before January 1, 2011
      • You, too, must complete a key assignment for each course, but you will submit your assessment electronically directly to the faculty member teaching the course, and not via the MAP system. Your faculty member will give you directions regarding the electronic submission. Like students using MAP, your submitted work will be assessed using the rubric for the key assignment.
        • *Students enrolled in the Science Online Master’s or the Out Of School Time Master’s Programs are exempt from the portfolio requirement at this time.
  • Disability Services for Students
    • Lesley University is committed to ensuring that all qualified students with disabilities are afforded an equal opportunity to participate in and benefit from its programs and services. To receive accommodations, a student must have a documented disability as defined by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), and provide documentation of the disability.  Eligibility for reasonable accommodations will be based on the documentation provided.  If you are a student with a documented disability, or feel that you may have a disability, please contact:
      • For on-campus students with learning disabilities or attention disorders: 
        • Maureen Riley, Director of Academic LD/ADD Services
        • 23 Mellen St., 5th floor, Office 504
        • 617.349.8464 (voice)   617.349.8558 (fax)
        • mriley@lesley.edu
      • For on-campus students with physical, sensory, or psychiatric disabilities, and off-campus students with learning disabilities, attention disorders, or physical, sensory, or psychiatric disabilities:
        • Laura J. Patey, Coordinator of Disability Services for Students
        • 23 Mellen St., 3rd floor, Office 313
        • 617.349.8194 (voice)  617.349.8544 (TTY)   617.349.8558 (fax)
        • lpatey@lesley.edu
  • Attendance Policy
    • The academic integrity of our programs depends on students attending all scheduled class meetings.  Students should discuss with faculty, in advance, any portion of a class meeting they cannot attend.  Absence from class may be reflected in the student’s grade.  The complete attendance policy may be found here
  • Official Format for Student Work
    • All School of Education students must use APA format for student papers, citations and bibliographies.  The complete SOE policy may be found on the School of Education web page.
  • Punctuality for ALL class sessions is mandatory
    • Being on time for class is not only a requirement, but
      also a form of politeness to the instructor and other members of the
      class.
    • Attendance and being on time is observed, noted and
      recorded by the Instructor, and will affect your grade.
  • Positive participation and involvement in ALL class
    activities

    • Positive participation and involvement means that each
      student will physically and mentally attend all classes, and give full
      attention, focus, and involvement to class activities, and discussions,
      while maintaining a positive willingness to learn. Participation is
      observed, noted and recorded by the Instructor, and will affect your
      grade.
  • Completion of ALL In-Class Assignments for the Key Assignment and Journal Writing (Learning Log)
    • Hands-On Assignments
    • Group Discussions
    • Individual & Group Activities
      • As a part of in-class assignments, students will be
        assigned small projects to complete relative to developing skills. In
        some instances students may work collaboratively.
  • Technology in Education Plagiarism, Writing and Dual
    Submission Policies-Version December 19, 2007

    • Plagiarism Policy
      • All work submitted to meet course requirements is
        expected to be the student’s own.
      • In the preparation of all papers and other written
        work submitted to meet course requirements and dissertations, a student
        must be careful to distinguish between ideas that are his or her own
        and those that have been derived from other sources.
      • Information and opinions drawn from all sources are
        to be attributed specifically to these sources. It is the student’s
        responsibility to learn and use the proper forms of citation.
        Quotations must be properly placed within quotation marks and must be
        fully cited. All paraphrased material must also be fully cited.
      • In all cases where ideas or material presented are
        derived from a student’s reading and research, the source used must be
        indicated. Students who submit work either not their own or without
        clear attribution to the original source, for whatever reason, will
        ordinarily be dismissed from the course and receive a failing grade.
      • Students are responsible for learning how to
        document sources and what constitutes plagiarism. Lesley faculty and
        the staff of the Center for Academic Achievement can provide help in
        understanding acceptable models for academic research. When in doubt
        about the proper use of source material, students are expected to seek
        guidance.
    • Assistance In Course Work And Writing
      • Students occasionally work with others or receive
        assistance in various aspects of their course work. Student should be
        very clear about how they are working with others and what types of
        assistance, if any, they are receiving.
      • Students must disclose to the instructor any plans
        for outside professional assistance on editing, statistical work, or
        other matters central to completing their work. The instructor will
        approve those kinds and levels of assistance that support, rather than
        supplant, the student’s research, writing and learning.
      • If assistance was approved, the student must
        specify what sort of assistance they received and from whom on the
        paper in question, upon submission. The goal of this oversight is to
        preserve the status of the work as the student’s own genuine
        intellectual product.
      Tell me and I’ll forget; show me and I may remember; involve me and I’ll understand. - Chinese Proverb
    • Dual Submission Of Papers
      • A paper or project used in a prior or concurrent
        course at Lesley University or another academic institution may not be
        used to meet the requirements in a subsequent course.
      • Students wishing to integrate the work of two
        separate courses in one paper may only do so if this plan is approved
        in advance in writing by both instructors involved and both course
        mentors. Papers submitted for more than one course must show both
        course numbers on the title page.
  • Makeup Policy
    • In the event of severely inclement weather, students
      will be notified through the site coordinator of any change and of the
      times when the class is rescheduled to fulfill the required hours.
  • Time Extensions and Incomplete Grades
    • Students who need a time extension to complete course
      work must obtain an Incomplete Course Contract from the Registrar’s
      Office or the program office. This should be completed in according to
      the conditions agreed upon with the instructor. Work must be submitted
      to the instructor no later than April 1 for Incomplete’s from the Fall
      Semester, and December 1 for Incomplete’s for the Spring Semester and
      Summer Session.
    • Those who do not complete their work by the deadline
      dates above will have I (Incomplete) permanently on their records.
      Contact the Registrar’s Office for more details
  • H1N1 (Swine Flu) Preparation
    • All students should consult the Lesley University’s web
      site at http://lesley.edu/info/H1N1/ for information on the University’s response to H1N1 Influenza.
    • Any student experiencing influenza symptoms should NOT
      attend classes or other events until at least 24 hours after fever has
      subsided without the use of medicine.
    • Please contact the instructor to make arrangements for
      coursework to be completed at home; cohort students should inform their
      site coordinator of their absence.
  • Pre-Course Assignments
    • Due Saturday of first weekend
  • Mid-Course Project
    • Due Saturday of second weekend
    • The best teachers constantly monitor what is happening to students as they set about learning and investigate when things do not proceed as planned or expected. They also enquire their own practice so they might get better at ensuring that their students learn successfully. - Demos 2004. About learning, Report of the Learning Working Group, Demos, London www.demos.co.uk
  • Final Project
    • Due within 30 days of final class

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READINGS

ARTICLES

  • REQUIRED
    • Art Becomes the Fourth R (In a
      Digital Media World)

      • By Jason Ohler
    • Cheating the Kids
      • By Bonnie Meltzer
    • Template Art, Template
      Thinking, MultiMediocracy and Other TomFoolery

      • By Jamie McKenzie, online at

        http://fno.org/apr99/clipart.html

    • Beyond ClipArt: Encouraging
      Children’s Own Drawings

      • By Peter Minshull, online at

        http://fno.org/jun99/draw.html

    • Kiss Clip Art Goodbye
      • by Bonnie Meltzer
    • Computer Based Concept Mapping:
      Active Studying for Active Learners

      • By Lynne Anderson-Inman and Leigh Zeitz
    • The Multimedia Paradox
      • By: Tad Simmons
      In an era when students design web sites for projects and integrate video, graphics, and animation into their presentations, art is fast becoming the new literacy of our times students must think and communicate as designers and artists. The age of art has arrived, leaving behind the text-centric world that has guided us for so long.¦ Art has become the Fourth R. - Jason Ohler
  • RECOMMENDED
    • Wondering With and About Images
      • By Jamie McKenzie,

        http://fromnowon.org/oct05/images.html

    • Visually Speaking
      • By Leonard Shlain
    • Life on the Screen
      • By George Lucas
    • Building Better Instruction: How Technology
      Supports Nine Research-Proven Instructional Strategies

      • By Kathy Brabec, (Wilson Database- PDF)
    • Digital Desperation: Reports on a Growing
      Technology and Equity Crisis

      • By: M. D. Roblyer, (Wilson Database- Full Text)

BOOKS

  • THERE IS NO REQUIRED BOOK FOR THIS CLASS
  • RECOMMENDED BOOKS
    • Brain
      Rules
      , by John Medina
    • Whole New Mind, by Daniel Pink
    • Presentation Zen, by Garr Reynolds

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GRADING OVERVIEW

Projects will be graded on their completeness, originality, creativity,
interdisciplinary approach, and appropriate use of technology. Written
portions of projects must be word-processed, thoroughly proofread, and
where appropriate, APA guidelines should be followed. Late work will be
penalized 5% per day without prior notice and approval by the
instructor. Sent work must be postmarked 30 days from the last course
date and be mailed to the instructor’s home address. Please enclose a
SASE if you want work returned. All feedback will be given via email
within two weeks of the final due date. If you do not receive an email
with feedback and final grades, do not hesitate to email the
instructor.

ASSIGNMENTS AND POINT SCALE

Digital Imagery Infused Lessons
Presentation
30% Due Saturday, Weekend 2
Key Assignment 30% Due Sunday, Weekend 2
Final Project – Arts and Tech Infused Lesson Plan 20% Due 30 days from last class
Attendance, Punctuality and Positive,
Active Participation
20% Everyday

GRADING STANDARDS

A Work is superior in all aspects and exceeds the
guidelines in one or more ways. In-class participation reflects a very
high degree of involvement in all aspects of the discussions,
activities and lab projects.
B Work is satisfactory and all requirements have been
met. In-class participation reflects satisfactory involvement in most
aspects of the discussions, activities and lab projects.
C Submitted work fails to meet the requirements.
Participation in activities fails to reflect involvement, commitment or
significant growth on the part of the student.
D/F Student work falls below college level expectations.

ELIGIBILITY FOR GRADE RECONSIDERATION OR INCOMPLETE

There are times when students, for reasons beyond their
control, cannot complete the assignments, or cannot attend the entire
class. It is the responsibility of any student having difficulty
completing course work to obtain an Incomplete Course
Contract
from the Registrar’s Office. In the absence of a
negotiated contract,incomplete work will result in a failing grade.Keep
an electronic copy of each project for your own reference as you may
have the option to revise your project in response to the instructor’s
comments. If your project is not at passing graduate level, your
project may be returned, and you may resubmit it for a grade
reconsideration, not to exceed the minimum passing grade. Projects
judged to be incomplete maybe revised and resubmitted as well.

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PRE-WEEKENDS HOMEWORK

TO DO BEFORE WEEKEND 1

  • TAKE SURVEY
  • READ ARTICLE
    • Read the article Art Becomes the 4th R, sent in an email
      from instructor before class. It is also available at myLesley and the
      class wiki.
    • Highlight three points that resonate
      with you in some way.
    • This reading will frame our thinking for the course and
      will be discussed in small groups Saturday morning
  • BRING MEDIA
    • 10 photos that are special to you
      • preferably on electronic media – a CD or USB drive
    • 1 favorite CD of music
    • A USB Removable Storage Drive
      • Often referred to as a flash drive, pen drive,
        travel drive, or thumb drive) with at least 1GB of storage capacity
      • This OPTIONAL but STRONGLY encouraged and will make your work much simpler
    • A digital camera, if you have one, with its cables,
      charger, and manual

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Everyone needs to talk, to hear and to play with language, to exercise the mind and emotions and tongue together. Out of this spirited speech can come meaningful, flavorful language, worth the time and effort of writing and rewriting, phrasing, rehearsing, and reading aloud. - Wolsch, R.A. and Wolsch, L.A.C

COURSE
SCHEDULE – 1st WEEKEND

WEEKEND 1 – SATURDAY MORNING 8AM – 12PM

  • INTRODUCTIONS
    • Once Around The Room
    • The Fear Factor
      • Technology can be our friend and artsy!
      • Puff Balls
    • Andragogy
      • Andragogy – Study of adult learning – the list below is from Wikipedia
        1. Adults need to know the reason for learning something (Need to Know)
        2. Experience (including error) provides the basis for learning activities (Foundation).
        3. Adults need to be responsible for their decisions on education; involvement in the planning and evaluation of their instruction (Self-concept).
        4. Adults are most interested in learning subjects having immediate relevance to their work and/or personal lives (Readiness).
        5. Adult learning is problem-centered rather than content-oriented (Orientation).
        6. Adults respond better to internal versus external motivators (Motivation).
      • What’s our plan?
        • Build a Portfolio of renewable resources, personal and professional reflection and of work demonstrating understanding
    • Educational Ninja
      • When the student is ready, the teacher will appear
      • Setting our priorities, goals and agenda for the
        class
      • ScottLeDuc.org
  • OVERVIEW
    • Explanation of Assignments
      • Building the key assignment and portfolio
      • Learning log
      • Establishing logistics: hours, meals and bio breaks
  • SHOWCASE
    • 21things4teachers.net – 21 National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T) lessons to better understand these technology tools and processes
  • LAB

    • Class Wiki
      • Create personal page
        • Upload picture
        • Use for reflective journal
        • Write goals for the class as entry 1
    • What’s a wiki?
    • VIDEO: Wiki’s in Plain English
    • Curriki educational wiki
    • OUTCOME: Establish personal wiki journal
  • REFLECTION

    • Goals for the class
    • PUBLISH to WIKI
  • READING, DISCUSSION and REFLECTION

    • Arts Becomes The 4th R Article
    • PUBLISH to ARTICLES PAGE of WIKI
  • SHOWCASE
  • LAB

  • READING, DISCUSSION and REFLECTION

    • Who’s your geek? Building a PLN (Personal/Professional Learning Network)
    • EXAMPLE: Will Richardson
    • PUBLISH TO WIKI
  • SHOWCASE
  • SHOWCASE

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WEEKEND 1 – SATURDAY AFTERNOON 1PM – 5PM

  • SHOWCASE
      • Ken Robinson Says Schools Kill Creativity at TED.com
  • SHOWCASE
  • LAB

  • KEY PROJECT COMPONENT

    • Images
    • PUBLISH TO MAP ePORTFOLIO
  • DISCUSSION and REFLECTION

    • Reflect on using visual materials in the classroom and editing photos and other visual material
    • PUBLISH TO WIKI
  • VIDEO
  • SHOWCASE
  • JIGSAW ARTICLE
    • Cheating the Kids
      • By Bonnie Meltzer
    • Template Art, Template
      Thinking, MultiMediocracy and Other TomFoolery

      • By Jamie McKenzie, online at

        http://fno.org/apr99/clipart.html

    • Beyond ClipArt: Encouraging
      Children’s Own Drawings

      • By Peter Minshull, online at

        http://fno.org/jun99/draw.html

    • Kiss Clip Art Goodbye
      • by Bonnie Meltzer

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WEEKEND 1 – SUNDAY MORNING 8AM – 12PM

Lack of limitation is the enemy of art. - Orson Welles

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WEEKEND 1 – SUNDAY AFTERNOON 1PM – 5PM

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To teach is to learn. - Japanese Proverb

MID-WEEKENDS
HOMEWORK

TO DO BEFORE WEEKEND 2

  • DISCUSSION and REFLECTION

    • Record procedures, experiences, thoughts, failures,
      successes and the ideas shared by others in a the Lesley Wiki or,
      if you cannot get your site to work in a Microsoft Word document.
      Combine, refine and add to the ideas and information from our in-class
      activities throughout our two weekends.
    • PUBLISH TO WIKI
  • WORK TIME
    • Work with your Digital Imagery Infused Lesson Ideas
      group to develop project ideas to be shared during weekend 2.
    • Bring supplies needed for the hands on portion of your
      lesson.
  • READ
    • Please select 3 quotes from the reading below and
      annotate it with your thoughts
    • You will be assigned one of the two articles below.
      Read for clear understanding and please select 3 quotes or ideas you
      can apply to instruction in your own classroom. Annotate them with your
      thoughts. Be ready to share these in small groups Saturday morning, 2nd weekend.
        1. Computer Based Concept Mapping:
          Active Studying for Active Learners

          • By Lynne Anderson-Inman and Leigh Zeitz
        2. The Multimedia Paradox
          • By: Tad Simmons

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COURSE
SCHEDULE – 2nd WEEKEND

WEEKEND 2 – SATURDAY MORNING 8AM – 12PM

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WEEKEND 2 – SATURDAY AFTERNOON 1PM – 5PM

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WEEKEND 2 – SUNDAY MORNING 8AM – 12PM

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WEEKEND 2 – SUNDAY AFTERNOON 1PM – 5PM

  • READING, DISCUSSION and REFLECTION

    • Using technology to affect Culturally Responsive Teaching
    • PUBLISH TO WIKI
  • LAB

    • ACTIVITY
      • Review Wiki Collaboration and MAP Portfolio Creation
        • Key Assignment- POSTED TO MAP
    • OUTCOME: Practice upload to MAP
  • PRESENTATION
    • Top Ten List
      • Technology treasures for the classroom
  • DISCUSSION
    • Developing a Technology Infused Integrated Arts
      Lesson: Final Project Planning
  • WORK TIME
    • Work on lessons, look at examples

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POST-WEEKENDS
HOMEWORK

TO DO AFTER WEEKEND 2

  • KEY PROJECT COMPONENT

    • Complete Media Enriched Lesson Plan
    • PUBLISH TO MAP ePORTFOLIO
  • READING, DISCUSSION and REFLECTION

    • Lesson Plan Reflection
      • Fill out self assessment rubrics and include with final reflection
    • PUBLISH TO ARTICLES PAGE of WIKI
  • SEND
    • Post to MAP

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PROJECTS

MID-TERM DIGITAL IMAGERY INFUSED LESSONS PRESENTATION

This assignment provides you with the opportunity to delve into the
world of digital imagery with a focus on curricular application.
Working in teams of 2-4, you will research ideas for incorporating
digital imagery in your classrooms, develop working samples, and then
share them with your colleagues during weekend 2. At least three ideas
and samples per person will be developed and shared. From the ideas you
experiment with, each team will select one to provide a hands on opportunity
for your classmates to explore. In class during weekend two, be
prepared to share a handout that includes information about your ideas
(color is not required-make enough copies for all classmates) and give
an hour long presentation which includes the hands on project work.

Example Scenario

A group of three 5th grade teachers decides to work
together. They begin by finding ideas they are interested in trying out
and then they try them. Sally finds or comes up with a great template
idea to share using Word and digital photos the students take, and she
wants to have her students make buttons using the Paint Accessory
Program to celebrate Veterans’ day. Gladys wants her students to write
and illustrate poetry using Word and the Paint Accessory for Mother’s
Day and she wants to do a readers’ theater using PowerPoint for the
Mother’s Day tea, and Mary Sue is having her students create their own
T-shirts for a field trip using the Paint Accessory Program, a digital
camera and Iron-On’s, then she wants to use digital cameras and
Photostory to review and discuss what was learned on the field trip.
Each of the ladies prepares their projects as though they were
the students creating them. Then they get together to share their
projects with one another, give feedback or further suggestions and
decide on one of the six ideas to have their masters class try out.
They then decide what will be shared via a handout (hyperlinks to idea
sites, information on print products like the buttons or t-shirt
iron-on’s,descriptions of each project with small digital photos, etc.).
When they come to class they bring all six projects to show and share,
then they engage the group in one of the six projects, start to finish.

  • A (95-100), A-(90-94)
    • Provided a handout of some sort (Inspiration web?
      Brochure? PowerPoint handouts with presenter notes? Newsletter?
      etc.) with carefully selected design features for the entire class
      detailing the ideas presented. These details should include information
      such as where you found the ideas, what materials are needed to
      complete them, how long each will take, and what management strategies
      will be used to ensure success.
  • Design Suggestions Discussed in Class for Handouts
    • Allow white space for clarity
    • Use light fonts on dark backgrounds and dark fonts on
      light backgrounds
    • Remove auto hyphenation if there is too much
      hyphenation in columns if creating a brochure
    • Be PICKY about graphics. They must be high quality
      print graphics (not monitor) without obvious pixels and they should
      enhance the content.
  • Demonstrated thorough mastery of the ideas being shared by
    ability to respond to questions

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KEY ASSIGNMENT

The key assignment for EARTS 6008 has students synthesizing all aspects of the digital media explored and practiced in the course, coupled best practices to create a well-rounded, multi-media presentation. Students will plan, design and create a multi-media presentation that demonstrates their acquired skill set and applies multi-media technology in a manner that supports creative expression.

The presentation will integrate the following customized multi-media components: audio of voice, music or other personally created combinations of sounds; personalized, manipulated digital images including scanned images or objects and digital photography; at least one self-created video clip or animation; design elements to illustrate how more than one style of media use enhances a message; navigation as appropriate; and links to resources that enhance or support their presentation. The key assignment will be published to the MAP ePortfolio

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FINAL PROJECT – TECHNOLOGY INFUSED INTEGRATED ARTS LESSON

After spending two weekends of class time developing your skills and
being immersed in ideas for blending art and technology, you should
feel prepared to begin considering how you might share some of these
skills and ideas with your students. This final project option will be
to formalize a complete lesson plan that employs the tools of
technology with a creative arts approach to meet a given curricular
objective. The lesson can be drawn from ideas shared in class or from
ideas found through other resources, but they must be adapted
specifically to your own students’ needs and your own district/state
standards. In other words, the lessons should be in your own
voice and any examples or materials needed to carry out the lesson
need to be developed and included. The lesson should be so complete
that I could easily come in and carry it out with your students. After
actually carrying out the lesson with your students, examples of their
work should be shared.

Elements to be included in the Lesson

  • APA Style Cover Page
  • The Rationale
    • In thoughtful preparation for the use of technology in
      a value-added, creative manner, you will write a one page rationale for
      the lesson. The rationale should address how technology is being used
      in a value added manner. The rationale paper should state WHY you are
      integrating educational technology and the arts into your curriculum.
      You should cite at least five (5) sources of information (using APA
      formatting) obtained from class or readings, and support your rationale
      with these sources and your own personal reflections
  • The Lesson
    • This should be a complete lesson, including all
      handouts, examples, materials etc. that are necessary for teaching the
      lesson. The lesson should follow a conventional instructional lesson
      format, and contain the following:

      • A one paragraph overview of the lesson
      • Subject area/topic and Grade level/content area
      • Goals, objectives, standards (for both the
        technology and the content area)
      • Hardware & software required for
        project/lesson
      • Time required for completion
      • Classroom management plans for success
        (pre-planning, assistants, buddies, etc.)
      • Examples, templates, or materials to prepare ahead
      • The Evaluation Criteria which includes both
        technology use and curricular content understanding (include assessment
        rubric, checklist, etc.)
      • Audience for sharing completed works
  • Applied Practice
    • Carry out the lesson with your students within the
      month before submission. Sharing the results of the lesson provides a
      way for you to reflect and for me to give feedback on the successes or
      challenges faced. Include a written reflection on the lesson and if
      possible, include examples of student work.

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RUBRICS

Rubrics For Self-Assessment And Instructor Assessment

Please self-assess your progress and performance in this Multimedia
Technologies for the Classroom course by circling the descriptors which
best describe your work. Submit this completed hard copy print out with
your final project. The instructor will use the same rubric for
assessment during the final grading process.

IN-CLASS ACTIVITIES/CLASS PARTICIPATION

Partially Proficient – C Proficient – B Advanced – A
In Class Labs Actively participates during
projects only when asked directly
Does not contribute to others’ thoughts;
Does not answer or ask questions Rarely displays active interest
Learning log has fewer than 10 entries.
Actively participates during
projects some of the time
At times, contributes to others’ thoughts; answers or asks questions
Displays active interest most of the time Learning log has the minimum
of 10 entries.
Actively participates in all in
class projects on a consistent basis
Contributes to others’ thoughts, answers or asks questions, shares
experiences
Displays consistent active interest Learning log has more than 10
entries.
Discussions Volunteers input only when asked
Asks few questions to further discussion
Draws few connections and applications of theory to practice
Was not consistently prepared to discuss/apply assigned readings
Volunteers input at times
Asks some questions to further discussion
At times, draws connections and applications of theory to practice
Was consistently prepared to discuss/apply assigned readings
Volunteers input consistently
Asks key questions to further discussion
Draws connections and applications of theory to practice
Consistently discussed application of assigned readings in a thoughtful
manner
General Often late
Some absences, incomplete make up work
Often not on task
Mostly on time
Some absences, but made up work afterwards
Usually on task
Somewhat helpful
Always on time
No absences or if needed, communicated ahead & did extra work
Always on task
Very helpful

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MID-TERM DIGITAL IMAGERY INFUSED LESSONS PRESENTATION

Partially Proficient
- C
Proficient – B Advanced – A
Design and contents of
presentation, brochure, or handout
Content is incomplete or unclear
Unclear or unsupportive images
Not useful as working tool
Content is complete, demonstrating
a basic understanding of the information Clear, meaningful imagery used
in presentation
Useful tool for future use
Content is detailed and in-depth
Content is organized in an easy-to-understand format Imagery is
thoughtfully selected and is of high quality
Tools for future reference are clear and helpful
Oral Presentation One or more presenters did not
participate or could not be heard
Visuals were read from rather than existing for visual support of an
oral presentation
Presentation time is not suitable for sufficient coverage of topic
Presenters are not able to answer questions accurately
Audience has to work to keep attention focused
Presentation was delivered in an easy-to-forget manner
All presenters played a role in the
delivery of the presentation and could be heard
Visuals were provided clear visual support while presenters focused on
their oral delivery
Presentation time is sufficient for basic coverage of topic
Presenters are able to answer questions accurately
Keeps audience attention
Presentation was delivered in a not-to-be-forgotten manner
All presenters played a necessary,
creative role in the delivery of the presentation and presentation
styles were engaging
Creative visuals provided clear, engaging visual support while
presenters focused on an engaging oral delivery
Presentation time was appropriate for complete coverage of topic
Presenters are able to answer questions accurately and with confidence
Highly interesting, memorable and engaging to the audience
Group Participation Certain group members appear to be
doing more work than others
Members do not appear to have communicated, planned, and cooperated well
Group members all appear to have
been involved at various stages in the process
Members appear to have communicated, planned and cooperated most of the
time
All group members appear to have
been fully, actively involved in the whole process
Members have communicated, planned, and cooperated well and with a
value for differing approaches and views

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FINAL PROJECT – TECHNOLOGY INFUSED INTEGRATED ARTS LESSON

Partially Proficient
- C
Proficient – B Advanced – A
Rationale Rationale is incomplete Rationale is complete and reflects
careful thought toward implementation
Rationale is complete, thoughtful,
and reflects careful analysis to determine the best tools to meet
curricular standards
Written Lesson Elements Contain few suggested elements
Do not employ technology’s MM capabilities in a value-added manner
Are not complete or clear
Assessment is not included
Contain most suggested elements
Employ technology’s MM capabilities in a value-added manner to some
extent
Fairly complete & clear
Assessment is included
Contains all suggested elements
Clearly employs technology’s MM capabilities in a value-added manner
Are very complete & clear
Assessment is included and measures both the technology and the content
components of the lesson
Mechanics Numerous typos, spelling, or
grammatical errors
APA formatting and citation requirements not met
Some typos, spellings, etc.
Very few grammatical errors
APA formatting and citation requirements met
No typos, spellings, etc.
Free of grammatical errors
APA formatting and citation requirements met
Applied Practice

The lesson was used with students,
but the reflection is incomplete

Examples of student work were not submitted

The lesson was used with students
and the reflection demonstrates includes a complete analysis &
critique

Plans for improvement are included

Examples of student work were submitted

The lesson was used with students
and the reflection demonstrates careful, insightful analysis and
critique

Plans for improvement are included

Examples of student work were submitted

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KEY ASSIGNMENT – PORTFOLIO

WA Teacher Performance Standards – 1a., 1b, 1d., 1f. 1g, 2a, 2c
Assignment Criteria 4 – Distinguished 3 – Proficient 2 – Developing Skills 1 – Unsatisfactory
Multimedia Presentation VIDEO – Creates a multi-media digital portfolio that uses video. Multimedia Presentation – Creates a multi-media presentation that includes exceptional example(s) of personally created video, demonstrating creative and original use of video editing and production. Multimedia Presentation – Creates a multi-media presentation that includes example(s) of personally created video, demonstrating basic knowledge of and practice with video editing and production. Multimedia Presentation – Creates a multi-media presentation that includes only video from other works. Knowledge of or practice with video editing and production is limited or none. Multimedia Presentation – Creates an incomplete multi-media presentation that includes no video.
Multimedia Presentation AUDIO Creates a multi-media digital portfolio that uses audio. Multimedia Presentation – Creates a multi-media presentation that includes exceptional example(s) of personally created audio, demonstrating creative and original use of audio editing and production. Multimedia Presentation – Creates a multi-media presentation that includes example(s) of personally created audio, demonstrating basic knowledge of and practice with audio editing and production. Multimedia Presentation – Creates a multi-media presentation that includes only audio from other works. Knowledge of or practice with audio editing and production is limited or none. Multimedia Presentation – Creates an incomplete multi-media presentation that includes no audio.
Multimedia Presentation IMAGES Creates a multi-media digital portfolio that uses imagery. Multimedia Presentation – Creates a multi-media presentation that includes exceptional example(s) of creatively manipulated imagery, demonstrating creative and original use of image capture and editing. Multimedia Presentation – Creates a multi-media presentation that includes example(s) of creatively manipulated imagery, demonstrating basic knowledge of and practice with image capture and editing. Multimedia Presentation – Creates a multi-media presentation that includes only images from other works. Knowledge of or practice with image capture and editing is limited or none. Multimedia Presentation – Creates an incomplete multi-media presentation that includes no images.
Multimedia Presentation LEARNING Creates a digital multi-media presentation that applies multi-media technology in a way that shares learning processes and supports creative expression. Multimedia Presentation – Creates an exceptional multi-media presentation that integrates multiple (4 or more) examples of multi-media technology while sharing their learning processes and showcasing their creative expression. Multimedia Presentation – Creates a multi-media presentation that integrates some (2-3) examples of multi-media technology while sharing their learning processes and showcasing their creative expression. Multimedia Presentation – Creates a multi-media presentation that integrates at least 1 example of multi-media technology while sharing a few of their learning processes and partially showcasing their creative expression. Multimedia Presentation – Creates an incomplete multi-media presentation, does not share any learning processes or showcase their creative expression.
Content Assessment CONTINUITY The digital multi-media presentation demonstrates continuity of thought and design elements. Content Assessment - The digital multi-media presentation very clearly demonstrates continuity of thought and design elements illustrating how more than one style of media use enhances a message. Content Assessmen - The digital multi-media presentation attempts to demonstrate continuity of thought and design elements illustrating how more than one style of media use enhances a message. Content Assessment The digital multi-media presentation lacks continuity of thought and design elements; falling short of illustrate how more than one style of media use enhances a message. Content Assessmen – The digital multi-media presentation does not demonstrate continuity of thought or design elements; failing to illustrate how more than one style of media use enhances a message.

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THANK YOU

  • This syllabus was developed with substantial material
    contributions from expert teachers Karen Mayfield and Michelle
    Strickland. They are amazing educators!

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Addition Material for Instructor

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  1. One Response to “Lesley EARTS 6008”

  2. By Janet Mudge on Nov 2, 2011 | Reply

    Hi Scott,

    Wow! Very comprehensive. Thanks for having this available for our PRE-view. Looking forward to the course.

    Thanks-

    Janet
    Kent/Auburn Cohort member

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